Monday, December 12, 2011

Sharing that learning is sweet!

Passing some sweetness around....

Today we begin for everyone with some exercises, to help us focus and make it a bit easier to share what we have done in the learning analysis. Today each person will speak and offer their own unique sense of traveling through the argument or story of the course. Our personal feelings are, of course, a special part of this. But do think of this primarily as an intellectual sharing of analysis as well as of any careful personal details. Celebrating each others' work and our own, and especially thinking together today about the knowledge we each bring into being is the collective project here, our feminist reconceptualization. So listen as carefully as you speak, because active listening is as necessary to collective thought. If someone else says something you intended to say, then -- thinking on your feet -- find another something to say that is a unique bit of your own work instead. 


Focusing exercises for presenting: 
EVERYONE:
1) find your favorite paragraph in the paper. Put a star next to it.
2) write down what you are most proud of in this paper.
3) put an arrow next to the place you think best describes the argument of the course.
4) write down your favorite reading and be prepared to say what element of its ANALYSIS made it special for you.


PICK ONE OF THESE TOO:
=write about a moment in the course where everything seemed to come together for you.
=write about a moment outside the course where you realized you were using something you had learned in the class.
=write about a moment when you discovered something new about how you were included in the argument of the class. 

WHEN IT IS YOUR TURN TO SPEAK:
pick out four of these to share. Focus on analysis -- of the course, readings, experiences, realizations -- especially, although feelings and politics have important places too. Be mindful of the time -- we want to allow time for everyone in the class to speak today -- give some real details: don't be too general. Do show off the hard thinking you are capable of. Make sure what you say is special and unique.

And may we keep running into each other, over and over, in friendship and connection and intellectual community and joyful living!


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Tuesday, December 6, 2011

swarming timeframes

Tuesday 6 Dec – How do we use the notion of an epistemological project?
•    rereading Davis as lens on all the other books
So how well does Davis’ notion of epistemological project travel? Can we use it to think about these books, ideas, activisms, methods, disciplines, feminisms?

Thursday 8 Dec – Feminist Time Machines: how can we historicize what is happening now?

•    finishing up and rereading Hewitt as lens on all the other books;
Read stuff you missed or reread the stuff that has become a touchstone for you; be able to say why and how. Why do feminists want to be able to historicize? How is that a kind of sharing? a kind of traveling?

Monday, November 28, 2011

Share Feminism/s, how?


REFLEXIVITY IN WOMEN’S STUDIES: SOLIDARITY IN RESISTANCE, FLEXIBILITY IN BUILDING



Tuesday 20 Nov – Share Feminism/s, how? with whom? with what care?
•    rereading Zandt as lens on all the other books
•    how to do learning analysis
What does Zandt have to teach us about the issues raised in the other books that we might have missed if we hadn’t read her work?


=== LEARNING ANALYSIS for Feminist Re Conceptualizations ===

Thursday 1 Dec – Intersectionality as Boundary Object, meaning different things to different feminisms?
•    finishing up and rereading Berger as lens on all the other books; read stuff you missed or reread the stuff that has become a touchstone for you; be able to say why and how.
How do different feminisms use intersectionality to share their urgent projects and their hopes for feminism?


lumping and splitting 
connection to boundary objects

Perry model of intellectual development   
in addition to its importance as a developmental schema for the adult learning processes of discrete individuals, what about these intellectual, psychological, psychic features as elements dynamically shifting back and forth, for example, when
• individuals and groups are under great stress 
• are confronted by new elements in shifting contexts
• enter into a new arena of knowledge or practice
• are forced into positions by polarization 
• are "converted" to new and strong epistemologies 
• are using shorthand versions of complexities for clarity
• are responding to urgent conditions requiring strong action

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MAKE A POINT OF THIS! CONNECTS TO HEWITT! 
Reading,  Conversation, and Reception with
Florence Howe on Monday December 5 at 3:00 in Taliaferro 1126.


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Monday, November 14, 2011

Our field comes to life, passions in workshop mode!


Tuesday 15 Nov – WORKSHOP #2 – Dynamics in Our Field of Women’s Studies
Today we will share our work poster session style: divide in two groups, and all move around talking to each other about work during the class time. 



•    Workshop 2: Dynamics in Our Field

For our second workshop you will create either a paper or poster (which determined by lot) in order to explore how feminists remember, participate in, and analyze the dynamics in our field of women’s studies. 

What is its history? What ways of analyzing power are best? How do particular disciplines locate the central concerns of women’s studies? How do feminist scholars share the work they do? 

You will explore two class texts carefully, and chose EITHER • to analyze Hewitt’s book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Berger’s The Intersectional Approach OR • to analyze Berger’s book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Hewitt’s No Permanent Waves 

• Berger’s collection demonstrates paradigm shifts in our field. NOTICE that it explores how to think THROUGH feminisms ABOUT feminisms. 

Hewitt’s book demonstrates that history doesn’t stand still. NOTICE and ask, why do we keep remaking our feminist pasts? 

No matter which of these approaches you take, also NOTICE that you will need to do some additional research. You will need to use the web to follow-up or look in greater detail at the kinds of feminisms displayed here, other ways of thinking about histories of feminism, and ways all of these are promoted in popular and scholarly media. Always make a point of connecting projects to class readings and lectures.

Thursday 17 Nov – WORKSHOP #2 – Talking about it all 
•    LOGBOOK 3 DUE along with either paper and handout or digital picture of poster, after presentations
Today we will have a conversation about what we learned, noticed, thought about, and draw from the last class presentations. 


Tuesday 22 Nov – NO CLASS: THANKSGIVING WEEK
Thursday 24 Nov – NO CLASS: HAPPY THANKSGIVING 


Monday, November 7, 2011

Waving at each other:
seeing through others' eyes, the next workshop



We can look at feminist histories through the eyes of different ways of understanding intersectionality; and we can look at how and why intersectionalities might differ through the eyes of feminist histories, generations, political agendas, and assumptions about what is better than what else.... 

Tuesday 8 Nov – Agendas, Activisms, Relocations
•    Hewitt: Part III: pick 3 of 5
Look through all of these enough to compare them all somewhat, then become an expert on the ones you choose. How do these projects each in their own specific way contribute to the epistemological project of the whole book? How can you tell?


=Brainstorming all the differences we can grasp. What contexts do they respond to? What constituencies are addressed? What political goals are assumed? How do they compare with your care-abouts?


=reports on what we all did last week!! (Katie gave talk at 4S: talksite here.

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Thursday 10 Nov – Comparing epistemological projects
•    Berger: Part IV: choose 2 of the 5 and everyone should read the epilogue
How might each of these chapters work to help us envision the future of intersectionality and to see what is at stake? 


=What questions and concerns are coming up as you prepare for next week's workshop? 

=What is at stake for you in different intersectional approaches, in different ways of conceptualizing waves? 

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Which chapters did you choose? Why? How can you let the authors alter your historical imagination? Can you let them turn it in-side out? Change how you think rather than justify how you think? What does that mean for feminists and feminisms?

I picked Ednie Garrison's framing of "Third Wave" as one of my readings (originally in Feminist Studies 2000). In some ways it justified my assumptions about the histories involved, but in other ways it altered them, opened up areas I hadn't thought about in those terms before.

For example, I already did not consider these feminisms strictly age related, but I didn't anticipate how Garrison would reframe them -- not generational but differentially oppositional, an analysis inspired by Chela Sandoval and attentive to culture and technology as historical agencies:

394: "The refusal to claim ownership of feminism allow these third wavers to maintain a sense of their own and other feminist-identified individuals' tactical subjectivity. When we understand that feminism is not about fitting into a mold but about expanding our ability to be revolutionary from within the worlds and communities and scenes we move around and through, then collective action becomes possible across the differences that affect people differently."

Notice this language: "the differences that affect people differently." 


Another one I picked was originally in Meridians 2008, so almost a decade later, Whitney Peoples' discussion of hip hop feminisms and the solidarity of black feminists across generations. She takes as her definition of "third wave" a specific history that defines it pivotally as a collective critique by women of color. (See her ftnote 3.) What alternate histories of the term exist at the same time? How can that be the case? How much does it matter and to whom? Is the "true origin" important? What does it mean to claim the origin of such a term?

And what does critique entail? If you critique something do you throw it out? Peoples' takes up this issue as she explores how hip-hop critique could divide black feminists but doesn't have to, and how it needn't be thrown out even if interrogated....


424: "Just as other black American feminists have chosen to engage other modes of cultural production that are inimical to the development of black women's subjectivity, hip-hop feminists refuse to turn away from difficult and volatile engagements with hip-hop. Bell hooks, for example, argues that the mainstream American film industry has long produced images of women, people of color, that have negated the humanity and subjectivity of black women. Hooks, however, does not advocate the black women abandon film. On the contrary she, like Pough in the case of hip-hop, says that they value of mainstream cinema lies not in the images it produces but in the critique of those images. [she quotes hooks on "the pleasure of interrogation."]...The hip-hop feminist agenda is one that takes its cue from hooks and others by using the critique to fashion an individual, social, and political agenda of inquiry and action for the contemporary moment.... It's the legacy of unmasking the specificity of women's experiences at the intersections of race and sex that continue to make black American feminism an indispensable mode of analysis and activism for many women today. Hip-hop feminists draw on the strength of that legacy while simultaneously drawing on the strength of movements of the contemporary moment such as hip-hop."

click for Black Youth project website
Note how hip-hop then becomes an agency of intersectionality here, and actually allows for a continuity of political analysis across age-generations of black feminists.

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Monday, October 24, 2011

Nothing Stays Still....

DYNAMICS IN OUR FIELD OF WOMEN’S STUDIESTuesday 25 Oct – Reframing Narratives & Reclaiming Histories
•    Hewitt: Part I: pick 3 of the 5 chapters in this section to read, be prepared to discuss why you chose the ones you did
How does Hewitt talk about traveling knowledges? How does travel across time compare to travel across space and geopolitical location? How can you compare what Hewitt does with what Davis does? With what Berger and Guidroz do? How are these epistemological projects similar and different? 



4: "Activists thus highlight their distinctiveness from -- and often superiority to -- previous feminist movements in the process of constituting themselves as the next wave." 

[KK: yes, but it should also be said that generational hierarchies of supposedly knowing things better exist as well!] 

How do "waves" and "generations" compare, converge, or divide? 

Look at Wikipedia's timeline of key events in the second wave (scroll down to see it). 
Wikipedia on the third wave.  
Wikipedia on the first wave
Which parts of the world are centered in these?
Wikipedia's Portal: Feminism  
Wikipedia's Feminism by country   

What about feminist generations? 
From Young Feminist Wire 
Symposium on inter- and transgenerational feminisms 
Call for papers by Feminist Memory    
Nancy Whittier's book & KK's handout on generations  

All six volumes of Stanton and Anthony's History of Woman Suffrage are available free as ebooks online. See Google books and Project Gutenberg. 

Hewitt, Thompson, Taylor, Chávez, Fernandes



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===Thursday 27 Oct – Theoretical Explorations, Exploring theories and their worlds
•    Berger: Part II: pick 2 of the 4 chapters in this section to read, be prepared to discuss why you chose the ones you did
Although you pick only 2 of these, look at all of them enough to compare the approaches they take, and to consider the disciplines they come from. How might that matter? 



Recall Yuval-Davis' point: (54): “social divisions, such as those relating to membership in particular castes or status as indigenous or refugee  people, tend to affect fewer people globally. At the same time, for those who are affected by these and other social divisions not mentioned here, such social  divisions are crucial and necessitate struggle to render them visible. This is, therefore, a case where recognition - of social power axes, not of social identities - is of crucial political importance.”

power: macro-, meso-, micro-political (fr structure to interpersonal interaction) [Foucault, biopower]
structure: longer term, more stable, affect most, mostly at macro-political levels and layers [Marx, social structure]

Keating, Luft, Caldwell, Sherwood 

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Tuesday 1 Nov – CLASS ON ITS OWN: KATIE AT 4S – Coming together and pulling apart, which is which?
•    Hewitt: Part II: pick 4 of 7
Coalitions happen on the ground with activists, how do activists work with other activisms? What are the difficulties involved?

Thursday 3 Nov – CLASS ON ITS OWN: KATIE AT 4S – Method, theory, praxis – do they need to be connected or are they already?
•    Berger: Part III: pick 2 of 5 from the section on methodological innovations
Come with ideas and questions that look ahead to our workshop. 


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from Bernice Johnson Reagon's Coalition Politics:  
343ff: "I wish there had been another way to graphically make me feel it because I belong to the group of people who are having a very difficult time being here. I feel as if I'm gonna keel over any minute and die. That is often what it feels like if you're really doing coalition work. Most of the time you feel threatened the core and if you don't, you're not really doing no coalescing.... Coalition work is not work done in your home. Coalition work has to be done in the streets.... You don’t get fed a lot in a coalition. In a coalition you have to give, and it is different from your home. You can’t stay there all the time. You go to the coalition for a few hours and then you go back and take your bottle wherever it is, and then you go back and coalesce some more." [In Barbara Smith, Home Girls: a black feminist anthology. Rutgers 2000]

• "listening with raw openness" (Keating 2009: 92)
• disagreeing in continued conversation that goes on! 
• complex personhood (Avery Gordon, Ghostly Matters 2008) 
• "some misunderstanding is inevitable" (Keating 2009: 94) 

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Monday, October 17, 2011

Point of View: our first workshop! Fun, yes!

Tuesday 18 Oct – WORKSHOP #1 – Power, Movements, Worlds
Today we will share our work poster session style: divide in two groups, and all move around talking to each other about work during the class time. Complete 3 eval sheets & one for yourself (turn these in next class). 

Thursday 20 Oct – WORKSHOP #1 – Talking about it all
•    LOGBOOK 2 DUE along with either paper and handout or digital picture of poster, after presentations
Today we will have a conversation about what we learned, noticed, thought about, and draw from the last class presentations. 


===
•    Workshop 1: Power, Movements, Worlds

For our first workshop you will create either a paper or poster (which determined by lot) in order to explore how feminists analyze how power structures our worlds. 

You will explore two class texts carefully, and chose EITHER 

• to analyze Zandt’s book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Davis’ The Making of Our Bodies, Our Selves; OR 

• to analyze Davis’ book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Zandt’s Share This! 

• Davis’ book explores power in transnational and transdisciplinary frames. NOTICE what it demonstrates and assumes about what counts as power, which social movements matter, and how worlds are connected across differences. 

• Zandt’s book explores accessibility and the currency of social media today. NOTICE who is addressed in this book, and why? 

No matter which of these approaches you take, also NOTICE that you will need to do some additional research. You will need to find out more about the various editions of the book Our Bodies, Our Selves, and you will need to play around with social media yourself, and do some web research checking out both Our Bodies, Our Selves and also how feminists today are using social media, as well as how social media and marketing are interconnected. Always make a point of connecting projects to class readings and lectures.

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Posters and papers are shared in one or the other of two class workshops. In each workshop you will do either a paper or a poster. Which one you will do when will be determined by lot. 

You cannot get full credit for either assignment until after you also present them on the first day of the workshop week, and participate in workshop follow-ups on the second day of the workshop week. In other words, just the written paper or the poster does not in itself complete the assignment. If an emergency or illness kept you from participation either or both days that week, to get full credit you will have to meet with three other students to share your work and their work outside class, and write up the experience and what you learned from it to complete the participation portion of that grade. 

SO DO NOT MAKE OTHER PLANS FOR THOSE DAYS: BUILD THEM CAREFULLY INTO YOUR SCHEDULE FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE TERM! Put them into your logbook from the beginning so that attending them will always be at the forefront of your term plans. 

This is also true of the final day of class, when you discuss your learning analysis with everyone else. Full credit for the learning analysis also requires attendance and participation on that last day. 

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Thursday, October 13, 2011

OBOS Interview

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Our Bodies Ourselves on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OurBodiesOurselves TV interview with Judy Norsigian, one of the original OBOS founders, on the new edition of "Our Bodies, Ourselves"! 

Monday, October 10, 2011

Connecting across differences....

Tuesday 11 Oct – Transnational Body/Politics
•    Davis Part III, read all of it (ch 6, reread 7); also read Davis’ essay on intersectionality (link for pdf online)


How is Davis’ analysis of OBOS similar to her analysis of intersectionality? (Don’t get sidetracked by the term “buzzword” in her title for the intersectionality article, or at least not at first. Consider it AFTER you have made your comparisons, and think about what other terms might have been better?
boundary object, buzzword, traveling theory


• acquiring new body understandings: Davis, p. 173: after translations of OBOS required inventing new words to express emotional care for one's body, one translator said: "I have developed a much greater love for my own body. It is not merely that I have to know it better but that I feel that I have learned new ways of experiencing the world differently."   

individualism from • POV Spanish translation (177, 180); • POV Bulgarian translation (189) :: different contexts, different oppositions; one expresses isolation from community resources & support, different from consumer health care commodified individually. the other expresses resistance to totalitarian structures, impersonal and collectivist in the worst sense, different from self-care and self-assertion needed both personally and socially. THINK NECKER CUBE: first one face, then another

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Thursday 13 Oct – Making Intersectionality Transnational?
•    Foundations Intersectionality, Berger Part I: Yuval-Davis’ essay
Why does Yuval-Davis start off with a little history of intersectionality? “All-inclusive”? Transversal? What can you learn about feminism in 2006 that will help you understand why she is approaching these issues the way she does? What other kinds of articles were being published in the journal European Journal of Women’s Studies in 2006? In other feminist journals in countries other than the US? What other feminist journals were big internationally in 2006? 

sedentism from Wikipedia  
sedentarism in Nomadic Studies 

Wikipedia versions "intersectionality": 

2005; 2007; 2010; 2011 

By 2007: includes line: "Collins' theory is one of particular interest because it represents the sociological crossroads between modern and post-modern feminist thought."  

By 2010: added: "Theories of intersectionality increasingly also address the more than human. Examples of posthuman intersectionality include ecofeminism and are under development in the field of animal studies."

=another line of argument, some including critique of multiculturalism, others centered around legal issues, others around academic disciplinary and other methodologies:

Gordon and Newfield, 1996, Mapping Multiculturalism 
critical race theory from Wikipedia  
Crenshaw on intersectionality, google scholar  1989, 1991, 1994 
Dill essay in FS 1983
Yuval-Davis essay in EJWS 2006 (23 yrs later) 
Davis on intersectionality 2008, bk OBOS 2007
Berger book beginning with Dill, 2009 

=& non-centering critiques of white women's movement from postcolonial, postmodernisms, Chicana feminisms: 

Chela Sandoval, Methodology of the Oppressed, 2000
postcolonial feminism from Wikipedia  
oppositional consciousness in Sandoval 2000
differential consciousness in Sandoval 2000  


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Collins book first published 1991. Then it was substantially revised in 2000. 

Patricia Hill Collins: Black Feminist Thought (2000):

p. 228: putting black women at the center without privileging their consciousness

• transversal politics: both/and thinking: varying expressions of power, distinctive forms of participation in domination and resistance
• US black women could be both penalized and privileged. So could others be.





boundary object III: some use intersectionality for this "transversal politics"
or even matrix of domination

p. 247: groups only have partial perspective on their own experiences
• and thus need critical self-reflection (think: violated assumptions?)
• groups police each other, making coalition difficulty

p. 248: no absolute oppressors or victims
• groups find some oppression more salient than others

p. 268: Elsa Barkley Brown: everyone can learn to pivot their "center. 
• everyone can learn to center in another experience, and, in this case, to engage "black feminist thought"

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Looking Through Histories and other Feminist Mappings


POWER, MOVEMENTS, WORLDS: FEMINISMS IN THE PLURAL, FEMINISTS IN MOVEMENT

 – Feminist Myths: Davis Part II
 – Foundations Intersectionality, Berger Part I: Dill
 – Transnational Body: Davis Part III
 
Foundations Intersectionality, Berger Part I: Yuval-Davis [& Guidroz]
Tuesday 18 Oct – WORKSHOP #1
Thursday 20 Oct – WORKSHOP #1 : LOGBOOK 2 DUE
  
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So you see here the shape of the next section of the course, and how it culminates in our first workshop. We have already finished Zandt (yes, you should have read all of it by now), and we will be finishing up Davis, while reading ahead in Berger for tools to use for projects for workshop 1. Remember what it is about?


•    Workshop 1: Power, Movements, Worlds

For our first workshop you will create either a paper or poster  in order to explore how feminists analyze how power structures our worlds. (Whether you are doing a paper or a poster has already been determined by lot; if you don't know which one you are doing, talk to Katie asap!) 

You will explore two class texts carefully, and chose EITHER 
• to analyze Zandt’s book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Davis’ The Making of Our Bodies, Our Selves; OR 
• to analyze Davis’ book through the analysis (eyes, lens) of Zandt’s Share This! 

Davis’ book explores power in transnational and transdisciplinary frames. NOTICE what it demonstrates and assumes about what counts as power, which social movements matter, and how worlds are connected across differences. 

Zandt’s book explores accessibility and the currency of social media today. NOTICE who is addressed in this book, and why? 

No matter which of these approaches you take, also NOTICE that you will need to do some additional research. 

You will need to find out more about the various editions of the book Our Bodies, Our Selves, and you will need to play around with social media yourself, and do some web research checking out both Our Bodies, Our Selves and also how feminists today are using social media, as well as how social media and marketing are interconnected. Always make a point of connecting projects to class readings and lectures.

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Tuesday 4 Oct – Feminist Myths in a Feminist Politics of Knowledge
•    Davis Part II, read all of it (chs 3, 4, 5)
Why does Davis connect “empowerment” and “bewitchment”? What’s her point here? And why might a “colonialist trope” be contrasted with something called a “critical epistemology?” What are feminist subjects and why do they need to be created? How does Davis make us aware of the time periods involved?



Davis, 85-6: the feminist myth in action:
• "make sense of their history"
• "an origin story"
• "become agents of historical change"
• "heroic tale with plucky female protagonists who bravely take on a series of powerful adversaries...and come out victorious."
• "a family saga about a group of women who created an enduring personal bond that enabled their political project to survive and thrive for more than three decades."
• "constructing a history that made sense in different and sometimes contradictory ways."
• "understand their individual and collective experiences at different periods"
• "provided the motor for the group's activism."
• "generated a powerful symbolic imagery" that allowed for global impact
• "a shadow side": "deny or gloss over events in the present that did not fit their collective sense of who they were or what their project was about"
• "an impediment to a more historically informed and self-reflexive understanding of themselves and their project"


From the Wikipedia on "myth": "The term 'myth' is often used colloquially to refer to a false story, but academic use of the term does not pass judgment on truth or falsity. In the study of folklore, a myth is a sacred narrative explaining how the world and humankind came to be in their present form. Many scholars in other fields use the term 'myth' in somewhat different ways. In a very broad sense, the word can refer to any traditional story."

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Thursday 6 Oct – Intersectionality’s Foundations
•    Berger Part I: Dill’s essay
Why would Dill start off with the notion of sisterhood? “All-inclusive”? What does that mean? What can you learn about feminism in 1983 that will help you understand why she is approaching these issues the way she does? What other kinds of articles were being published in the journal Feminist Studies in 1983? In other feminist journals? What other feminist journals were big in 1983? 


DOWNLOAD DAVIS ON INTERSECTIONALITY FOR NEXT CLASS! PDF HERE.

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post positive realist and post positive realism
   
Mohanty's Feminism without Borders pprealist
virtual speculum haraway   
problematize, criticize, critique, debunk 

socialist feminism   

bourgeois individualism 
Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
• using privileges of class and race to get into public sphere despite the disadvantages of gender 
• calling into question the politics of personal experience as decentering experiential differences (of power by race and class) that are structural 
• "sisterhood" as feminist myth, usable by some more than others, with its shadow side. 
• women of color, inside, rejecting, along side, pushed outside, uninterested in, accomplishing other justice goals.... 


elegant, accessible, quick take <====> dense, specialized, detailed take 
considering the spirit and the letter of the story, or stories 
boundary object -- which parts are detailed, which parts are broadly drawn, for what reasons, when? 

earning "sisterhood" -- not given, but part a shared struggle -- whose struggles shared with who else? standpoint and shared struggle -- what about anger and power?

exceptional vs. normative practices in feminist movements -- the roles of racism, anti-racism, ideals and realities -- political expediency and the abandonment of black women in the history of feminist movements in the US, participating in the creation of separate movements of color and race -- what and when to make choices? who has to and why? hierarchies of oppression? universality? research and methology in the social sciences? class differences within collectivities of black women?


salience and intersections: intersectionality   
oppositional consciousness and chicana theories and mythologies of malinche   
how many "intersections"? should any be "centered"? when about all women of color and when about particular groups of women of color? why might it be important to center particular women of color, when and for what reasons? can intersectionality itself be critiqued? what does that entail?
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Sunday, September 25, 2011

Liberation When? Starship Gender?

Tuesday 27 Sept – Feminist Successes and Success Stories?
•    find out everything you can about the different editions of Our Bodies, Our Selves. Look BOTH on the web and GO TO THE LIBRARY TOO!

•    LOGBOOK #1 DUE
Okay! You now have many tools for projects for our class! Make sure your plans to accomplish it all are in order! Show them off in logbook #1. Be sure you and your partner have ways of helping each other stay on track and work with care. What have Davis and Zandt already taught you about feminist reading and research? What does each one teach you about the other? What does the web add to it all? What does working and being physically present in the library add? Let’s get onto moving feminisms!

Thursday 1 Sept – NO CLASS: ROSH HASHANAH



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Friday, September 16, 2011

When it gets intense.... SHARE!

Tuesday 20 Sept – Social media web research: beyond google and the Wikipedia, where do you go?  How to do this seriously? 
•    HOW TO MAKE POSTERS, DIGITAL PICTURES, AND USE AND MAKE DATA VISUALIZATIONS
•    read ahead in Berger, and pick 5 things to do serious web research about.
(Notice what you need to do for Thursday too – plan out how to get it all done for the week).
What did you choose in Berger to research on the web and why? what were your results? how did you get them? what records did you need to keep to demonstrate both the results and the methods for us? Did you come across pictures that mattered in this research? What are data visualizations and did you come across any in this research? Be sure you spend at least as much time doing all this as you ordinarily do reading for class. 

• Wikipedia on visualizations 
Wordle  
• Google data visualizations examples  

Check out this link from WMST 400 about posters and handouts too! 

Always bring in notes answering the questions for each class! 

Berger1, Berger2, Berger3, Berger4 

=== Web Action 3
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Thursday 22 Sept – How the transnational and the transdisciplinary live on the Web
•    HOW TO WRITE PAPERS, CREATE HANDOUTS, USE CITATIONS, AND FIND CITATION STYLES ON THE WEB
•    bring in the results of your serious web research on transnational feminisms, and be prepared to tell us why this information is on the web, who made it, what it is for, who is using it and why, and what that all means.
What do Zandt and Davis have to tell us that helps us understand what sorts of knowledge live on the web? What does looking for and analyzing such knowledges about transnational feminisms tell us about the work of both Zandt and Davis? How can we flip back and forth between one way of seeing things and another? What does that have to do with what happens when knowledge travels? 
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Meet with partners briefly and pool the information you gathered for today:
  • Results of web research on transnational feminisms
Consider:
  • What is this information on the web?
  • Who made it?
  • What is it for?
  • Who is using it and why?
  • What this all means! What do Zandt and Davis have to tell us that helps us understand what we have found?
  • What do the results of your web research tell you about the work of both Zandt and Davis?
  • How does doing web work help you think about what it might mean to look at Zandt’s work through Davis’ eyes, or Davis’ work through Zandt’s eyes?

We will use this as a basis for general discussion for 30 mins.

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Why do we use footnotes? How do they place us in networks of trust and of sharing knowledges? What might feminists in particular think about when they look deeply into citation and its record-keeping? Some thoughts we want to consider as we consider how feminists share trust and knowledge:

From a scholarly collective blog on doing history, a contributor post: "On Footnotes and Doing History" by Lisa Clark Diller: [bold emphasis is mine, for your particular attention]

"Who we think it important to cite, what range of sources were important (or available) at the time, and the family of historiographical ancestors we choose for ourselves all reveal our location in time and situate us on an ideological map.

"Footnotes reveal our technical proficiency, but they do so within a particular context. While in grad school, I can remember discounting entire volumes of historical research because the footnotes were so 'thin.' And one of my advisors at the University of Chicago would warn us to look with grave suspicion on any early modernist who cited too many printed sources. I’m less puritanical in my standards now. And [Anthony] Grafton [1999. The Footnote: A curious history. Harvard] has reminded me that: 'No accumulation of footnotes can prove that every statement in the text rests on an unassailable mountain of attested facts. Footnotes exist, rather, to perform two other functions. First, they persuade: they convince the reader that the historian has done an acceptable amount of work . . . . Second, they indicate the chief sources that the historian has actually used” (22). [in other words, create trust and authority.]

"We sometimes still operate under the assumption that if we have all the 'original sources' our argument will be solid. But what makes history interesting is all the various interpretations that we can develop from the same sources. It is part of why we revisit the same problems over and over again. Interpretation as well as sources give each of us our originality. This is decidedly not the same thing as saying that any interpretation of the documents is as good as another, but it is what keeps me from reading a scholarly tome and thinking that because the footnotes took up 37% of each page I read, no one need any longer do research on that subject. Grafton also reminded me to be careful in judging the scholarship of an earlier generation by the type or quantity of footnotes.

"As I sweat through proper citation of digital works and decide how much to include or exclude from my own footnotes, I am glad to remember that this process isn’t simply about showing off my guild credentials. It’s also a way to 'out' myself regarding my priorities and methods. The evidence I use won’t be considered equally sufficient for all time; but then again, I don’t expect to answer historical questions and decide their significance once and for all.

"The footnote reminds me of the time-laden nature of my queries and verifications." [1]


[1] Diller, "On Footnotes," The Historical Society.  &amp; 
Dilller, Lisa Clark. 2010. "On Footnotes and Doing History." The Historical Society [Website] 22 December. Retrieved 11 Feb 2011 at http://histsociety.blogspot.com/2010/12/on-footnotes-and-doing-history.html
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searching for citation formats on the web? • Google it!How they do it at The Feminist Press. • How they do it at Feminist Studies.
what about making research posters? • Google it!  

how can citations demonstrate the traveling knowledges of feminists? what sorts of citations would make visible or clarify transnational feminisms on the web? how do citations participate in the sharing of transdisciplinary knowledges? 

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Thursday, September 8, 2011

Care Abouts

Tuesday 13 Sept – This is the book I always wanted to write: how to care about it all
•    Zandt, ch 4; • Davis ackn., intro, ch 1 (note that it is a lot better to read everything for the whole week together if possible, and then focus on each day for discussion preparation)
•    WHO WILL YOU PARTNER WITH FOR THE SEMESTER?
Some feminist philosophers talk about what they call “personal care-abouts” in knowledge making. What are Zandt’s and Davis’ personal care-abouts as they reveal them to us? How can you use this class for your personal care-abouts? How can you make the class projects fit into those care-abouts? How will you partner with others to support each other’s care-abouts? Begin project #1 today with your partner: freewriting, brainstorming, googling, scheduling time together.


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As you come into the class today, immediately start working with others to figure out:
• WHO WILL YOU PARTNER WITH FOR THE SEMESTER? How can you use this class for your personal care-abouts? 
How can you make the class projects fit into those care-abouts? How will you partner with others to support each other’s care-abouts? 
BEFORE CLASS STARTS EVEN: Begin project #1 today with your partner: freewriting, brainstorming, googling, scheduling time together.


NOTICE: the advice about reading ahead! Read each weekend for the whole week if at all possible. And if you can, just go ahead and read all of Zandt while you are on a roll there. 

If you work this way this semester you will have this class, and possibly your other classes aced. 

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PULL OUT THE NOTES YOU MADE TO PREPARE FOR CLASS

How does the How to Read handout work? In what ways does it help with all our reading? 
=What three things you don't usually do did you pick to do?




In what ways do we have to modify the handout to deal with new formats of reading? How do we alter it to apply to:
=Kindle books or ebooks or audiobooks?
=to websites and hyperlinks? 

=to videos and other multimedia? 
=which ebook samples did you get? what aps did you find?


Why do we read in the order we do? What happens when we alter the order of reading? Why might this matter? 
=why do we read conclusions first? why do we read acknowledgements too?
=how do Zandt's comments about sharing on social media apply to the social format of the seminar? what comparisons can you make? 

What about the Wikipedia?
=Look up "gift economy" on the Wikipedia....
=What does Zandt have to say about the Wikipedia?

=What is crowdsourcing? How is it part of a whole ecology of social media, and why does it help to think in this way? 
=What forms of mature trust do we need to be authentic in media ecologies? 
=How does Zandt recommend we "manage authority"?




This graphic comes from a fascinating website: emergent by design


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Thursday 15 Sept – Sharing is Daring: when knowledge travels what happens?
•    Zandt, ch 5 and the rest of it; • Davis, ch 2
•    HOW TO MAKE LOGBOOK AND KEEP YOUR SCHOLARLY RECORDS
Global feminism? one or many? what are the goals of feminist practice? Who is going to share what, where and how? And how does web research itself figure into all of this? What does web research add to what we can know ABOUT Zandt and Davis themselves? To what we can know about their projects as we see them in these book objects? To what we can know about HOW they think as well as WHAT they think? 







 how has this picture traveled? How can you find out?  

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• How do you locate Zandt's website? Davis'? How current are they? What does this tell you?  
• What is an "epistemological project"? how will this structure our course? 
• What does Davis have to say about intersectionality? How did you find this out? How will you connect that to your web research on Berger's collection for this Thursday? PDF.  



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WHAT SORTS OF RECORDS DO YOU NEED TO KEEP?
=what goes in the logbook? what will help you most? what will allow you and Katie to be on the same page? what will help you plan and read ahead?
=taking notes from the web: websites, wikipedia, hyperlinks, vids and other media: How is this the same as reading? how is it different? 


Bring in notes in which you address these questions and the ones in the description for today's class. Also bring in notes on the following:

• What kinds of records will help you keep track of what you need to do for class: each class, each week, for each project, for graded assignments, over the course of the term? 
• What kinds of records will help you keep track of web research?
• What kinds of records will help you keep track of library research? How are these two the same? different?


• What kinds of records will make it impossible for you to inadvertently (or deliberately) commit plagiarism? What ensures that?








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